12 Zen Stories That Will Teach You To Live Ultimate Happy Life (Life Lesson)

Zen Stories

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12 Zen Stories That Will Teach You To Live Ultimate Happy Life (Life Lesson)
12 Zen Stories That Will Teach You To Live Ultimate Happy Life (Life Lesson)

12 Zen Stories That Will Teach You To Live Ultimate Happy Life (Life Lesson)

Sometimes, just by hearing about someone, we seem to relate us with them. Because, somewhere down, we feel connected with the emotion, feeling and having the same thought process. We feel they see the World the same as we do.

But, sometimes someone’s thoughts are so different from our thought that we failed to see them from the righteous way. As if, they’re in some different dimension of the thinking process. This is the time when someone helps you see through that angle which helps us differentiate between right and wrong. And, help us understand the World better.

We bring you, those angles which enlighten the thought process of the monks and help us understand how they see the World and what differentiate them from us. These stories come with a moral, which you can try to implement in your life solving your own problems.

So, here are the 12 Zen Stories That Will Teach You To Live Ultimate Happy Life (Life Lesson)

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Zen Stories – Obsessed

Two traveling monks reached a river where they met a young woman. Wary of the current, she asked if they could carry her across. One of the monks hesitated, but the other quickly picked her up onto his shoulders, transported her across the water, and put her down on the other bank. She thanked him and departed.

As the monks continued on their way, the one was brooding and preoccupied. Unable to hold his silence, he spoke out.

Brother, our spiritual training teaches us to avoid any contact with women, but you picked that one up on your shoulders and carried her!”

Brother,” the second monk replied,
“I set her down on the other side, while you are still carrying her.”

 

Zen Stories – Dreaming

The great Taoist master Chuang Tzu once dreamt that he was a butterfly fluttering here and there. In the dream, he had no awareness of his individuality as a person. He was only a butterfly. Suddenly, he awoke and found himself laying there, a person once again.

But then he thought to himself,

Was I before a man who dreamt about being a butterfly, or am I now a butterfly who dreams about being a man?”

Zen Stories – Not Dead Yet

The Emperor asked Master Gudo,

What happens to a man of enlightenment after death?”

How should I know?” replied Gudo.

Because you are a master,” answered the Emperor.

Yes, sir, ” said Gudo, “but not a dead one.”

 

Zen Stories – Going With the Flow

A Taoist story tells of an old man who accidentally fell into the river rapids leading to a high and dangerous waterfall. Onlookers feared for his life. Miraculously, he came out alive and unharmed downstream at the bottom of the falls. People asked him how he managed to survive.

I accommodated myself to the water, not the water to me. Without thinking, I allowed myself to be shaped by it. Plunging into the swirl, I came out with the swirl. This is how I survived.”

 

Zen Stories – Chasing Two Rabbits

 A martial arts student approached his teacher with a question.

I’d like to improve my knowledge of the martial arts. In addition to learning from you, I’d like to study with another teacher in order to learn another style. What do you think of this idea?”

The hunter who chases two rabbits,” answered the master, “catches neither one.”

 

Zen Stories – Wanting God

 A hermit was meditating by a river when a young man interrupted him. “Master, I wish to become your disciple,” said the man. “Why?” replied the hermit. The young man thought for a moment. “Because I want to find God.”

The master jumped up, grabbed him by the scruff of his neck, dragged him into the river, and plunged his head under water. After holding him there for a minute, with him kicking and struggling to free himself, the master finally pulled him up out of the river. The young man coughed up water and gasped to get his breath.

When he eventually quieted down, the master spoke. “Tell me, what you wanted most of all when you were under water.”

Air!” answered the man.

Very well,” said the master. “Go home and come back to me when you want God as much as you just wanted air.”

 

Zen Stories – Destiny

 During a momentous battle, a Japanese general decided to attack even though his army was greatly outnumbered. He was confident they would win, but his men were filled with doubt. On the way to the battle, they stopped at a religious shrine. After praying with the men, the general took out a coin and said,

I shall now toss this coin. If it is heads, we shall win. If tails, we shall lose. Destiny will now reveal itself.”

He threw the coin into the air and all watched intently as it landed. It was heads. The soldiers were so overjoyed and filled with confidence that they vigorously attacked the enemy and were victorious. After the battle, a lieutenant remarked to the general,

No one can change destiny.”

Quite right,” the general replied as he showed the lieutenant the coin, which had heads on both sides.

 

Zen Stories – Books

 Once there was a well-known philosopher and scholar who devoted himself to the study of Zen for many years.

On the day that he finally attained enlightenment,

he took all of his books out into the yard, and burned them all.

 

Zen Stories – More Is Not Enough

 There was once a stone cutter who was dissatisfied with himself and with his position in life. One day he passed a wealthy merchant’s house. Through the open gateway, he saw many fine possessions and important visitors. “How powerful that merchant must be!” thought the stone cutter. He became very envious and wished that he could be like the merchant.

To his great surprise, he suddenly became the merchant, enjoying more luxuries and power than he had ever imagined, but envied and detested by those less wealthy than himself. Soon a high official passed by, carried in a sedan chair, accompanied by attendants and escorted by soldiers beating gongs. Everyone, no matter how wealthy, had to bow low before the procession. “How powerful that official is!” he thought. “I wish that I could be a high official!”

Then he became the high official, carried everywhere in his embroidered sedan chair, feared and hated by the people all around. It was a hot summer day, so the official felt very uncomfortable in the sticky sedan chair. He looked up at the sun. It shone proudly in the sky, unaffected by his presence. “How powerful the sun is!” he thought. “I wish that I could be the sun!”

Then he became the sun, shining fiercely down on everyone, scorching the fields, cursed by the farmers and laborers. But a huge black cloud moved between him and the earth, so that his light could no longer shine on everything below. “How powerful that storm cloud is!” he thought. “I wish that I could be a cloud!”

Then he became the cloud, flooding the fields and villages, shouted at by everyone. But soon he found that he was being pushed away by some great force, and realized that it was the wind. “How powerful it is!” he thought. “I wish that I could be the wind!”

Then he became the wind, blowing tiles off the roofs of houses, uprooting trees, feared and hated by all below him. But after a while, he ran up against something that would not move, no matter how forcefully he blew against it – a huge, towering rock. “How powerful that rock is!” he thought. “I wish that I could be a rock!”

Then he became the rock, more powerful than anything else on earth. But as he stood there, he heard the sound of a hammer pounding a chisel into the hard surface, and felt himself being changed. “What could be more powerful than I, the rock?” he thought.

He looked down and saw far below him the figure of a stone cutter.

 

Zen Stories – Sound of Silence

 Four monks decided to meditate silently without speaking for two weeks. By nightfall on the first day, the candle began to flicker and then went out.

The first monk said, “Oh, no! The candle is out.”

The second monk said, “Aren’t we not supposed to talk?”

The third monk said, “Why must you two break the silence?”

The fourth monk laughed and said, “Ha! I’m the only one who didn’t speak.”

 

Zen Stories – Bike

 A Zen Teacher saw five of his students return from the market, riding their bicycles. When they had dismounted, the teacher asked the students,

Why are you riding your bicycles?”

The first student replied, “The bicycle is carrying this sack of potatoes. I am glad that I do not have to carry them on my back!”

The teacher praised the student, saying, “You are a smart boy. When you grow old, you will not walk hunched over, as I do.”

The second student replied, “I love to watch the trees and fields pass by as I roll down the path.”

The teacher commended the student, “Your eyes are open and you see the world.”

The third student replied, “When I ride my bicycle, I’m content to chant, Nam Myoho Renge Kyo” (meaning: to enable all people to put their lives in harmony or rhythm with the law of life, or Dharma)

The teacher gave praise to the third student, “Your mind will roll with the ease of a newly trued wheel.”

The fourth student answered, “Riding my bicycle, I live in harmony with all beings.”

The teacher was pleased and said, “You are riding on the golden path of non-harming.”

The fifth student replied, “I ride my bicycle to ride my bicycle.”

The teacher went and sat at the feet of the fifth student, and said, “I am your disciple.”

 

Zen Stories – The Gift of Insults

There once lived a great warrior. Though quite old, he still was able to defeat any challenger. His reputation extended far and wide throughout the land and many students gathered to study under him.

One day an infamous young warrior arrived at the village. He was determined to be the first man to defeat the great master. Along with his strength, he had an uncanny ability to spot and exploit any weakness in an opponent. He would wait for his opponent to make the first move, thus revealing a weakness, and then would strike with merciless force and lightning speed. No one had ever lasted with him in a match beyond the first move. Much against the advice of his concerned students, the old master gladly accepted the young warrior’s challenge.

As the two squared off for battle, the young warrior began to hurl insults at the old master. He threw dirt and spit in his face. For hours he verbally assaulted him with every curse and insult known to mankind. But the old warrior merely stood there motionless and calm. Finally, the young warrior exhausted himself. Knowing he was defeated, he justifies feeling shamed.

Somewhat disappointed that he did not fight the insolent youth, the students gathered around the old master and questioned him. “How could you endure such an indignity? How did you drive him away?”

If someone comes to give you a gift and you do not receive it,” the master replied, “to whom does the gift belong?”

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