UN International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition, Theme

United Nation (UN) 23 August International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade

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International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 23 August
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 23 August

United Nation(UN) International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition, Theme 23 August 

The International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is celebrated on the 23rd of August every year. The International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition aims to inscribe the tragedy of the slave trade in the memory of all peoples.

In accordance with the objectives of the intercultural project “The Slave Route”, it should offer an opportunity for the collective consideration of the historical causes, the methods and consequences of this tragedy, and for an analysis of the interactions to which it has given rise between Africa, Europe, America and the Caribbean.

The Director-General of UNESCO invites the Ministers of Culture of all the Member States to organize events every year on that date, in which all the population of their country and, in particular, young people, educators, artists and intellectuals participate.

The International Day of Memory of the slave trade and its abolition was celebrated for the first time in several countries, in particular in Haiti (August 23, 1998) and Goree in Senegal (August 23, 1999).

Cultural events and debates were also organized. The year 2001 saw the participation of the Mulhouse Textile Museum in France in the form of a workshop for fabrics called “Indiennes de Traite” (a type of calico) that served as currency for the exchange of slaves in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Slavery: –

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition Theme
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition Theme

Slavery has existed since the beginning of civilizations where the growth of cultivation and war caused injustices that allowed the unfortunate possibility of kidnapping and keeping men, women and children as slaves for domestic, labour, agricultural, entertainment or sexual services. It should be noted that many despised slave owners and attempts to free slaves, for example, the Essenes and Therapeutae1.

The slave trade, particularly in the Mediterranean region (around 1000 to 1500 CE) became big business and thousands of slaves served a variety of purposes and services. Since then, the slave trade had no barriers and spread to other regions of the world.

The triangular trade was an international network that linked the economies of the Americas, Africa and Europe and transported approximately 25 to 30 million enslaved men, women and children. The transatlantic slave trade itself moved approximately 15 to 18 million captive slaves, excluding the millions who died along the way, during wars, capture raids, incarceration in barracks, or the forced march to commercial posts and meeting centres, and during the Paso “(transatlantic crossing); it was estimated that five more died for each prisoner.

The triangular trade route began with ships leaving Western Europe with weapons, gunpowder, beer and rum, textiles and other manufactured products that would be exchanged for human beings. Then, the captured humans who were now slaves were sent to America, where they would be sold throughout the continent.

The last step involved the ships that returned with agricultural products manufactured by captive slaves, as well as cotton, sugar, wood and tobacco, among other products. The entire operation lasted approximately 18 months and the main trading countries were England, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain.

This type of slavery became a “totalitarian system for economic, political, social and sexual exploitation, based on force, violence and ideology of racism. A “dialectic of oppression”, a system of social death to which escape was only possible, manumission or death. it is treated as property, belongs to its owner and has no rights

Transatlantic Slave Trade: –

The transatlantic trade began in the late fifteenth century after the Portuguese conquest through the Atlantic Ocean, which was followed by the Spanish conquest and the Caribbean of Christopher Columbus.

However, the transatlantic slave trade was like no other, considering:

1.) Its scale and duration,

2.) The victimization of slaves who were black African men, women and children, and

3.) The “intent of intellectual legitimating on his behalf” which consists of an anti-black ideology and the legalization of such an organization.

Considered as the first “system of globalization”, this slave trade, in particular, covered Africa, America, Europe, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean, which makes it one of the largest deportations in history with important global economic implications. However, many also considered it, like the French historian Jean-Michel Deveau, as one of “the greatest tragedies in the history of mankind in terms of scale and duration”.

International Day of Slave Memory: –

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nation
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition United Nation

The International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition was established by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in a resolution of 1997, and was first observed in 1998. The day is for people to reflect on “The historical causes, methods and consequences of the slave trade”.

It was chosen on August 23, since it was on this day in 1791 that the slave uprising that led to the Haitian Revolution took place. The Haitian revolution saw the dispossession of chains by slaves in the French colony of San Domingue, which was located on the island of Hispaniola.

This event marked a decisive moment in the eventual destruction of the international slave trade. The transatlantic slave trade, which brought slaves to the Americas of Africa, and goods back to Europe, and slavery itself, lasted until the nineteenth century.

In the United States, the slave trade was banned in 1808, and slavery was abolished throughout the country by the approval of the 13th Amendment in 1865, after the Civil War. Here is a timeline of the prohibition of the slave trade and slavery around the world.

The International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is celebrated on Friday, August 23, 2019. It is celebrated annually on August 23, 1998.

Consider doing the Freedom Centre in Cincinnati, OH, USA. UU, An educational trip for you and your family. You can explore from slavery to freedom and learn how enslaved workers endured the unthinkable and how the heroes of freedom fought for equality for all.

Watch the movie continue the fight and learn how Freedom’s promise has not yet been fulfilled. Visit the world’s first museum-quality permanent exhibition on modern slavery, Invisible: Slavery Today, and discover how millions of people around the world remain enslaved.

You can also learn how you can become a modern abolitionist thanks to Freedom Centre partners in Invisible Slavery Today: Free the Slaves, Good weave, International Justice Mission and Polaris Project.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Centre opened its doors in August 2004 on the banks of the Ohio River in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. Since then, more than 1.3 million people have visited its exhibitions and permanent and changing public programs, inspiring everyone to take courageous measures for freedom. It is the ideal place to commemorate the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

Recognizing the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 2016, UNESCO aims to guarantee the dignity and equality of all human beings, without distinction.

Therefore, we think it appropriate to use this day as an opportunity to discuss modern slavery that has not yet been abolished, that is, human trafficking. Both the trafficking of workers and sexual exploitation persist today, affecting 3 out of every 1,000 people worldwide.

With such a scope, we encourage you to open your minds and look forward … We also celebrate what is in our rear viewing window, the freedom of many. But this should not distract us from the realities we face today:

1. According to some estimates, approximately 80% of trafficking involves sexual exploitation and 19% involves labour exploitation.

2. There are approximately 20 to 30 million slaves in the world today.

3. According to the US Department of State. UU, Between 600 and 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders every year, of which 80% are women and half are children.

We encourage you to take a second look at the abolition of the slave trade, and we recognize that a battle has been won, but this war is not over. Educate yourself, inform yourself and defend the freedom of those who are still trapped in servitude. The only way to achieve social justice is to improve and recognize that abolition has not yet been achieved.

Abolition of the Slave Trade: –

The campaign against slavery in the British Empire took 20 years to come into effect because even though the slave trade industry together with the transatlantic slave trade was a huge industry, not everyone was aware of the operations and conditions that they made it particularly frightening.

The information was not very widespread since many in Europe were illiterate. In addition to the scant information about the slave trade and its atrocities in circulation, there were not many opportunities that ordinary people could pursue or entertain to make an effective change at that time.

In addition, women were not given a voice and could not vote, and the people in power had little interest in what people had to say. In addition, the elites who were aware of the evil of slavery had the money and power to influence the government, but they benefited very well from the slave trade and felt too comfortable in their way of life to want any change.

These setbacks delayed the slave trade abolition campaign by the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, but, nonetheless, it was launched. The campaign focused on lobbying Parliament to abolish the slave trade, as they believed it was a tactical strategy that would eventually lead to the eradication of slavery.

In addition, the abolitionists created awareness through different means and tactics, such as the arts, which along with the campaign had a significant impact on Parliament to do something about the slave trade.

Although most of the successive abolition was due to the rebellion and revolution of slaves in Haiti, the campaign and tactics of the abolitionists generated a great public awareness of the truth of the slave trade and slavery.

Background: –

At the end of August 1791, an uprising began in Santo Domingo (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic) that would have an important effect on the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade. The rebellion of slaves in the area weakened the Caribbean colonial system, which provoked an uprising that led to the abolition of slavery and gave the island its independence. It marked the beginning of the destruction of the slavery system, the slave trade and colonialism.

The International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition was held for the first time in many countries, in particular in Haiti, on 23 August 1998 and in Senegal on 23 August 1999. Each year, the Organization of the United Nations for Education, Science and Culture. (UNESCO) reminds the international community of the importance of commemorating this day.

This date also pays tribute to those who worked hard to abolish the slave trade and slavery around the world. This commitment and the actions used to fight against the system of slavery had an impact on the human rights movement.

Symbols: –

The UNESCO logo shows a drawing of a temple with the acronym “UNESCO” under the roof of the temple and on top of the foundation of the temple. Under the temple is the words “United Nations Organization for Education, Science and Culture”. This logo is often used in promotional material for the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

How to celebrate International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition: –

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 23 August
International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition 23 August

Each year, the UN invites people from around the world, including educators, students and artists, to organize events that focus on the theme of this day. Theatre companies, cultural organizations, musicians and artists participate in this day by expressing their resistance against slavery through performances that involve music, dance and drama.

Educators promote the day by informing people about the historical events associated with the slave trade, the consequences of the slave trade and to promote tolerance and human rights.

Schools and youth organizations are invited to organize, promote and sustain activities in cooperation with cultural institutes, historians and other specialists and the media, to increase awareness of the slave trade and slavery, its causes and consequences, including modern forms of slavery foster solidarity with peoples who have suffered because of slavery and celebrate the African diaspora.

Many organizations, including youth associations, government agencies and non-governmental organizations, actively participate in the event to educate society about the negative consequences of the slave trade.

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition Theme: –

 

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