International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme 2019

International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme

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International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme
International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme

 International Day against nuclear tests

The International Day against nuclear test is celebrated every year on 29th August. Since the nuclear weapons tests began on July 16, 1945, almost 2,000 tests have been carried out. In the early days of the nuclear tests, little attention was paid to their devastating effects on human life, much less to the dangers of the nuclear consequences of atmospheric tests.

Retrospective and history have shown us the frightening and tragic effects of nuclear weapons testing, especially when controlled conditions go wrong, and in view of the much more powerful and destructive nuclear weapons that exist today.

The human and environmental tragedies that are the result of nuclear tests are compelling reasons for the need to observe the International Day against Nuclear Tests, a day in which events, activities and educational messages aim to capture the attention of the world and underscore the need for unified efforts. to prevent further testing of nuclear weapons.

The international instrument to end all forms of nuclear testing is the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) of 1996, which, unfortunately, has not yet entered into force.

On December 2, 2009, the 64th session of the General Assembly of the United Nations declared the International Day against Nuclear Tests on August 29 by adopting resolution 64/35 unanimously.

The resolution calls for greater awareness and education “about the effects of nuclear weapons test explosions or any other nuclear explosion and the need for them to cease as one of the means to achieve the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons.” initiated by the Republic of Kazakhstan, together with a large number of sponsors and co-sponsors with a view to commemorating the closure of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test site on 29 August 1991.

The objective of the Day is to promote the United Nations, the Member States, intergovernmental organizations -Government organizations, academic institutions, youth networks and the media to inform, educate and defend the need to ban nuclear weapons testing as a valuable step towards a safer world.

2010 marked the inaugural commemoration of the International Day against Nuclear Tests. Every year, since then, the day has been observed through the coordination of various activities around the world, such as symposia, conferences, exhibitions, competitions, publications, conferences in academic institutions, media and other initiatives.

Since its inception, many bilateral and multilateral governmental developments, as well as extensive movements in civil society, have helped to advance the cause of the ban on nuclear testing.

In addition, “convinced that nuclear disarmament and the total elimination of nuclear weapons are the only absolute guarantee against the use or threat of nuclear weapons,” the General Assembly designated September 26 as the “International Day of Elimination”.

Total Nuclear Weapons “, which is dedicated to promoting the goal of the total elimination of nuclear weapons through the mobilization of international efforts. First, in October 2013, the resolution (A / RES / 68/32) was a follow-up to the high-level meeting on nuclear disarmament held on September 26, 2013, at the United Nations General Assembly.

The International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons was held for the first time in September 2014. The International Day against Nuclear Tests, together with other events and actions, has fostered a global environment with more optimistic prospects for a world free of nuclear weapons.

As the Secretary-General acknowledged in his new disarmament agenda “Ensuring our common future” launched on May 24, 2018, the anti-testing standard is an example of a measure that serves the objectives of disarmament and non-proliferation.

By restricting the development of new advanced types of nuclear weapons, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty halts the arms race. It also serves as a powerful normative barrier against potential states that could seek to develop, manufacture and, subsequently, acquire nuclear weapons in violation of their non-proliferation commitments.

Every effort must be made to ensure the entry into force of the CTBT and preserve its place in international architecture. In this regard, the Secretary-General appeals to all remaining States whose ratifications are required for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty to enter into force to commit to signing the Treaty at an early date if they have not yet done so, and to accelerate the completion of its ratification processes.

The UN hopes that one day all nuclear weapons will be eliminated. Until then, it is necessary to observe the International Day against Nuclear Tests as we work to promote peace and security throughout the world. Initiatives such as the International Day against Nuclear Testing are part of the global efforts towards a world free of nuclear weapons.

The International Day against Nuclear Tests seeks to raise awareness about the negative effects of nuclear weapons and the need to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons. The day also serves to educate people around the world about the need to ban nuclear weapons testing to ensure global security.

Since the first nuclear test in 1945, more than 2,000 nuclear tests were carried out and accidents occurred, such as the Chernobyl, Ukraine, an accident of 1986, which ended in tragedy, long-term radiation poisoning and damage to the atmosphere.

The International Day against Nuclear Tests was declared by the General Assembly of the United Nations in December 2009. It is celebrated every year on August 29, a day commemorating the 1991 closure of the Soviet Semipalatinsk site, the installation of trials nuclear weapons in the world, in the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan

Background of International Day against Nuclear Tests: –

International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme 2
International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme 2

The history of nuclear testing began on July 16, 1945, when an atomic bomb was used at a desert testing site in Alamogordo, New Mexico, in the United States. Between 1945 and 1996 more than 2000 nuclear tests were carried out all over the world. Nuclear weapons tests are generally divided into different categories that reflect the means or location of the test:

  • Atmospheric tests.
  • Underwater tests.
  • Underground tests.

Over the years, there have been calls to ban nuclear testing to ensure the protection of people’s lives and the environment that surrounds them. The UN adopted a draft resolution in late 2009 for an international day against nuclear testing to raise public awareness of the threats and dangers of nuclear weapons. It was also expected that the member states of the UN would move towards the idea of nuclear disarmament.

The International Day against Nuclear Tests was declared to be held annually on August 29, marking the closure of one of the largest nuclear testing sites in the world (in Kazakhstan) in 1991.

The day is dedicated to improving awareness public and education about the effects of nuclear weapons tests, explosions or any other nuclear explosion. It also promotes the need for a world free of nuclear weapons. The first official observance of the day was marked for August 29, 2010.

Effects of Nuclear Tests:

  • There are many adverse effects of Nuclear Tests. The contamination of radiation in the atmosphere, water and land severely affects the life of plants and animals.
  • Has important effects on human health, prolonged exposure to radiation permanently damages internal organs; Some of the effects of radiation are bone cancer, thyroid cancer, leukaemia, effects on breast milk and cause deformations during childbirth.
  • Before 1950, damage caused by nuclear tests was not considered.
  • It is estimated that the pumps tested between 1945 and 1980 have effects equivalent to 29,000 times the size of the Hiroshima pump.

Treaties to Ban Nuclear Tests:

  • In 1968, U.S, U.K and the Soviet Union signed the Partial Test Ban Treaty (PTBT) to prohibit tests carried out in the atmosphere and underwater. But France and China continued the atmospheric tests until 1980.
  • Even underground tests cause severe effects on the soil in the surrounding area of the explosion.
  • The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was established in 1996 to ban all types of nuclear weapons tests. Due to the opposite states, this has not reached the force.

What do people do?

The International Day against Nuclear Tests aims to raise awareness of the need to prevent nuclear catastrophes to avoid devastating effects on humanity, the environment and the planet.

Many people take advantage of the day as an opportunity to share their perspective on the issue of nuclear weapons and testing. Different organizations can organize educational and public activities to raise awareness about the use of nuclear weapons and the dangers related to the testing and use of nuclear weapons.

International Day against Nuclear Tests Top Events and Things to Do: –

International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme 3
International Day Against Nuclear Tests, Theme 3
  • Watch a movie or documentary about nuclear disasters. Some suggestions are The Day After (1983), Threads (1984), Trinity and beyond (1995), Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Seconds from Disaster: Meltdown at Chernobyl.
  • Attend the meeting held by the president of the United Nations General Assembly by going to the event in person or watching the recorded transmission.
  • Read a book on nuclear issues in today’s world. Some suggestions are: Answering the future of nuclear energy (2011), in mortal hands (2009) and Nuclear or not? Does nuclear energy have a place in a sustainable energy future? (2007).
  • Donate to the Pacific Nuclear Charity Foundation. Its main objective is to promote philanthropy and medical research on the speciality of nuclear medicine.
  • Spread the knowledge of the day
  • Public life
  • The International Day against Nuclear Tests is a worldwide celebration, but it is not a holiday.

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